13
Apr
24
Mar
TURCHI Featured on Americana Music Show 
Check out a premiere of three songs off the new album on the Americana Music Show HERE: 
http://www.americanamusicshow.com/episode-184-turchi/
“Reed Turchi plays three tracks from Can’t Bury Your Past (Amazon, iTunes) and talks about his stolen song title, airplane drunks, and being attacked by ‘coons.”
Interview Recap between Reed and host-Calvin Powers 
Calvin asks Reed Turchi to describe the band’s “kudzu boogie” sound. He says, “the main things, especially for this album, a lot of slide guitar and kind of trance blues of the North Mississippi variety, droning along on one chord. Not anything like the blues 12 bar Chicago progression a lot of people might be familiar with. It stays on the one, driving rhythm. Cam Weeks on drums and Andrew Hamlet on bass get to have a lot of fun. What we really pushed for on this album as well is incorporating a lot of Memphis saxophone and soul organs and keyboards.”
Reed Turchi sets up “Take Me Home.” He says, “That song came out of a long time spent on highways driving around. The EP before this one took a more lower key meditation on that time. This song came out of a lyrical riff that kept coming to mind every time I started to write a song. After I moved back to western North Carolina I decided it would be time to give that line a chance to shine. And instead of a some sort of sad morose song about homecoming or being away from home. We decided to make it more of a vent of frustration on one hand about not being able to get back. and then kind of a celebration and full on rock about being back and the battle it takes sometimes to get there.”
Calvin asks about the music scene in Asheville/Western North Carolina. He says, “I can’t really claim western North Carolina being a huge influence on the overall band sound, however growing up in Asheville and the Swannanoa Valley I was influenced by the strength of the music, arts, and visual arts scene there. It’s an area that inspires a lot people regardless of age or medium or outlet. That sort of sense of inspiration is strong and it speaks across all genres that people are working in.”
Reed Turchi sets up, “(We Could Still Be) Each Other’s Alibi.” He says, “I stole the track name from a friend of mine. I’ve also had the pleasure in Swannanoa of getting to grow up around the Warren Wilson college writing program, which my Dad directed for a long time. One of the poets who was there and I spent some time with is Rodney Jones. One night late he was joking about the country album he was working on. He plays some guitar himself. He mentioned that one of the songs would be ‘(We Could Still Be) Each Other’s Alibi.’ I asked if he was serious about the song and about a year later as I was working on this song for myself I asked if he was serious and he said ‘not really’ and I just took it from there. But the inspiration definitely came from Rodney Jones. You get a line that poignant and it’s easy to fill in the cast of characters and the setting around it.”
Reed Turchi sets up “Sawzall.” He says, “This comes from another story of domestic fineness. A guy I was sitting next to on a plane. Before we were able to take off he turned to me, about six miller lite mini-cans in and said, ‘I don’t know how they let me on this plane. I got no wallet. I got no keys. I lost everything.” and I was like well this is exactly what the flight attendants would like to be notified of before take off.’ I took him has harmless though belligerent. He went on to describe the story of his recent divorce. And in the day his wife gave him to clean out the house. He’d decided to get an eight ball of cocaine and rent a sawzall, cut the house in half and just bulldozer half of it back and let it burn. I sat on that about a year and a half, just thinking about the song that could become and then this was the album for it.”
Listen to the full episode HERE. 

TURCHI Featured on Americana Music Show 

Check out a premiere of three songs off the new album on the Americana Music Show HERE: 

http://www.americanamusicshow.com/episode-184-turchi/

Reed Turchi plays three tracks from Can’t Bury Your Past (Amazon, iTunes) and talks about his stolen song title, airplane drunks, and being attacked by ‘coons.”

Interview Recap between Reed and host-Calvin Powers 

Calvin asks Reed Turchi to describe the band’s “kudzu boogie” sound. He says, “the main things, especially for this album, a lot of slide guitar and kind of trance blues of the North Mississippi variety, droning along on one chord. Not anything like the blues 12 bar Chicago progression a lot of people might be familiar with. It stays on the one, driving rhythm. Cam Weeks on drums and Andrew Hamlet on bass get to have a lot of fun. What we really pushed for on this album as well is incorporating a lot of Memphis saxophone and soul organs and keyboards.”

Reed Turchi sets up “Take Me Home.” He says, “That song came out of a long time spent on highways driving around. The EP before this one took a more lower key meditation on that time. This song came out of a lyrical riff that kept coming to mind every time I started to write a song. After I moved back to western North Carolina I decided it would be time to give that line a chance to shine. And instead of a some sort of sad morose song about homecoming or being away from home. We decided to make it more of a vent of frustration on one hand about not being able to get back. and then kind of a celebration and full on rock about being back and the battle it takes sometimes to get there.”

Calvin asks about the music scene in Asheville/Western North Carolina. He says, “I can’t really claim western North Carolina being a huge influence on the overall band sound, however growing up in Asheville and the Swannanoa Valley I was influenced by the strength of the music, arts, and visual arts scene there. It’s an area that inspires a lot people regardless of age or medium or outlet. That sort of sense of inspiration is strong and it speaks across all genres that people are working in.”

Reed Turchi sets up, “(We Could Still Be) Each Other’s Alibi.” He says, “I stole the track name from a friend of mine. I’ve also had the pleasure in Swannanoa of getting to grow up around the Warren Wilson college writing program, which my Dad directed for a long time. One of the poets who was there and I spent some time with is Rodney Jones. One night late he was joking about the country album he was working on. He plays some guitar himself. He mentioned that one of the songs would be ‘(We Could Still Be) Each Other’s Alibi.’ I asked if he was serious about the song and about a year later as I was working on this song for myself I asked if he was serious and he said ‘not really’ and I just took it from there. But the inspiration definitely came from Rodney Jones. You get a line that poignant and it’s easy to fill in the cast of characters and the setting around it.”

Reed Turchi sets up “Sawzall.” He says, “This comes from another story of domestic fineness. A guy I was sitting next to on a plane. Before we were able to take off he turned to me, about six miller lite mini-cans in and said, ‘I don’t know how they let me on this plane. I got no wallet. I got no keys. I lost everything.” and I was like well this is exactly what the flight attendants would like to be notified of before take off.’ I took him has harmless though belligerent. He went on to describe the story of his recent divorce. And in the day his wife gave him to clean out the house. He’d decided to get an eight ball of cocaine and rent a sawzall, cut the house in half and just bulldozer half of it back and let it burn. I sat on that about a year and a half, just thinking about the song that could become and then this was the album for it.”

Listen to the full episode HERE

23
Mar
Our new album, “Can’t Bury Your Past,” is available for pre-order NOW, after more than a year and a half in the making, and lord knows how many shows and miles. We couldn’t be prouder of this record—10 songs that push far beyond anything we’ve done before, while keeping the kudzu boogie trance you’ve come to love solidly at the core. We were fortunate to be joined by our good friends and incredible musicians to round things out: Art Edmaiston on saxophone, and Anthony Farrell on keyboards and organs. You’ve never heard anything quite like this…but, back to the fact of the matter: here’s why you should pre-order… in the words of Butch Cassidy, someone say “1, 2, 3, GO!” 1) Pre-order includes IMMEDIATE digital download of entire album (link will be emailed to you)2) Pre-order includes exclusive access to 8-song live full-band concert video recorded December, 2013. 3) First 100 orders will be hand-numbered and signed in order received! now go HERE: www.turchi.bandcamp.com to listen and order.
Oh, and check it out—the CD comes with a full poster and lyric sheet, so you can sing along to your favorite tunes, or figure out what on earth Reed is talking about. Thank you so much for your support and enthusiasm—we’ll be touring behind this record for some time, and hope to see ya soon (more updates on that in a bit). This record is our next step forward. 

Our new album, “Can’t Bury Your Past,” is available for pre-order NOW, after more than a year and a half in the making, and lord knows how many shows and miles. We couldn’t be prouder of this record—10 songs that push far beyond anything we’ve done before, while keeping the kudzu boogie trance you’ve come to love solidly at the core. We were fortunate to be joined by our good friends and incredible musicians to round things out: Art Edmaiston on saxophone, and Anthony Farrell on keyboards and organs. 

You’ve never heard anything quite like this…but, back to the fact of the matter: here’s why you should pre-order… in the words of Butch Cassidy, someone say “1, 2, 3, GO!” 

1) Pre-order includes IMMEDIATE digital download of entire album (link will be emailed to you)

2) Pre-order includes exclusive access to 8-song live full-band concert video recorded December, 2013. 

3) First 100 orders will be hand-numbered and signed in order received! 

now go HERE: www.turchi.bandcamp.com to listen and order.

Oh, and check it out—the CD comes with a full poster and lyric sheet, so you can sing along to your favorite tunes, or figure out what on earth Reed is talking about. 

Thank you so much for your support and enthusiasm—we’ll be touring behind this record for some time, and hope to see ya soon (more updates on that in a bit). This record is our next step forward. 

03
Mar
americansongwriter:

Song Premiere: Turchi, “Take Me Back Home”
The Artist: Turchi, a slide guitar based blues/rock band.The Song: “Take Me Back Home,” from Can’t Bury Your Past, out April 22nd.Fun Fact: When playing solo, lead singer Reed Turchi likes to play a three stringed cigar box guitar. Check out a performance here.Songwriter Says: “This song kept trying to write itself one way or another, over the course of a long year and 60,000 miles worth of highway, when scenic overlooks, truck stops, and the backseat of the van were about the extent of my songwriting environments,” Reed Turchi tells us.
Click here to continue reading and listen

americansongwriter:

Song Premiere: Turchi, “Take Me Back Home”

The Artist: Turchi, a slide guitar based blues/rock band.
The Song: “Take Me Back Home,” from Can’t Bury Your Past, out April 22nd.
Fun Fact: When playing solo, lead singer Reed Turchi likes to play a three stringed cigar box guitar. Check out a performance here.
Songwriter Says: “This song kept trying to write itself one way or another, over the course of a long year and 60,000 miles worth of highway, when scenic overlooks, truck stops, and the backseat of the van were about the extent of my songwriting environments,” Reed Turchi tells us.

Click here to continue reading and listen

28
Feb

"THIS IS WHY THEY CALL IT THE DIRTY SOUTH"

American Songwriter premieres “Take Me Back Home,” the lead track off of “Can’t Bury Your Past.” 

“This song kept trying to write itself one way or another, over the course of a long year and 60,000 miles worth of highway, when scenic overlooks, truck stops, and the backseat of the van were about the extent of my songwriting environments,” Reed Turchi tells us.

“My songs usually begin with a guitar phrase and stream-of-consciousness lyrics until a vocal melody falls into place, and then after that timing is worked out, I go back and write the actual words–sometimes the improvised lyrics turn out to be part of the finished song, but more often than not they only serve as placeholders.

After a point, I realized that with every song I started the first words to come to mind were about going back home to the mountains, a subconscious plea I ignored for too long–the lyrics and story were so obvious that the song hid from me in plain sight. As soon as I did move back to the mountains I knew it was time to give these “placeholder” lyrics a shot and embrace them—and, wouldn’t ya know, the verses fell into place almost instantly.

The music came together spontaneously as well, as it was meant to, with most of the final structure and transitions settled after the very first time we played the song together live, stumbling into it unexpectedly as part of an improvised medley. A few small changes were made, but we were determined to keep as much of the original energy as possible, preserving that sense of not knowing exactly where the song may lead, which is something that doesn’t always translate well into the studio.

With this version on the album, we really ended up with the best of both the live and studio worlds. We tracked the guitar, bass, and drums together live (one take, no overdubs, no headphones) in a tiny, sweltering living-room studio in Nashville in mid-July in the middle of a tour. After we got off that stretch of shows and heard the rough mix, we had two of our good friends Art Edmaiston (tenor and baritone saxophone) and Anthony Farrell (keyboard and organ) overdub their parts, before doing a final mix with Adam Hill at Ardent Studios in Memphis.

The result is fantastic, and a microcosm of the sound of the full album–driving rhythm from the drums and bass, aggressive lead guitar, gritty-Memphis-motel horns, and soul-soaked keyboard and organ.

That’s a long way from the lonesome, moonlit drives this song started from, but I know that we, and the song, are better for the journey.”

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